Ambassador for Israel

Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet, Dr.

Dr. Zhitomirsky-Geffet received her PhD in Computer Science in 2006. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor in the Information Science department in Bar-Ilan University, Israel. Her primary field of research is development of methodologies and tools for effective knowledge organization and ontology-based data analysis in digital humanities. In the past decade she published several articles on these topics in respected journals such as Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, Computational Linguistics, PLoS One.

“Working on the Local Time Machine for Jerusalem, I strive to make a significant contribution to digitisation, standardisation and integration of the Jewish and Israeli information currently distributed in a variety of organisations, in particular, information related to the history of Jerusalem in the last three thousand years. Digitisation, analysis and integration of Jerusalem data from various archaeological, historical and literary sources will enable leveraging research and discovering the hidden treasures of the National and Jerusalem’s cultural heritage, which will finally become available to researchers and the general public.”

Ambassadors

Adam Sofronijević, Dr. (Serbia)

Deputy Director at University of Belgrade Library and Docent at the Faculty of Applied Management, Economics and Finance Belgrade

Ágnes Telek (Hungary)

Deputy Director of the Department of Maps, Plans and Photographs, Budapest City Archives (BCA)

Eleni Galiotou (Greece)

+ Professor at the Department of Informatics and Computer Engineering of the University of West Attica

Josep Lladós, Dr. (Spain)

Director of the Computer Vision Center and Computer Science professor at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Tino Mager (Netherlands)

Post-doc at the Chair of History of Architecture and Urban Planning at Delft University of Technology

Žarko Vujošević, Dr. (Serbia)

Docent at the Faculty of Philosophy of the University of Belgrade, Chair in History in the Early Middle Ages and Auxiliary Historical Sciences